Organic Foods Delivered Right to the Door

Organic Foods Delivered Right to the Door

For those many seniors, growing their own fruits and vegetables can become a challenge, and making it to the local farmer’s market on Saturday mornings is simply not an option. However, they do not have to stop getting very fresh, and organic, fruits and vegetables. A relatively new service can deliver the goods to their home.

Here is how it generally works: Customers can place an order either online or over the phone, and they often have total control over what and how much comes in their delivery. The produce provider delivers the fruits and vegetables about once a week. While it’s just as convenient as ordering groceries through a supermarket, this produce often comes directly from the growers, ensuring it is fresh and nutritious. Additionally, these services focus on pesticide-free, organic produce, which can help an older person avoid any chemicals that could unintentionally make them ill.

Treehugger.com recommends five organizations that deliver food in different parts of the country:

1. Door to Door Organics – Healthy Foods

This company delivers foods in several states, including Colorado, Kansas City, Illinois, and Michigan. It also partners with Suburban Organics (www.suburbanorganics.com/learn/) to deliver goods in New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Delaware. To continue deliveries during the winter, the company gathers food from warmer climates and international organic farms. The organization lists what is gathered and where on its website week-by-week.

2. Boxed Greens

While this company was designed to provide fresh produce from farms in the Phoenix, Ariz. area, it also offers an overnight state-and-nationwide delivery service. The boxes are not frozen, but kept cold with reusable freezer packs. In addition to essential and more unusual options, Boxed Greens can also provide a Breakfast Box, which contains seasonal fruits and fresh granola.

3. The Green Polka Dot Box

This company provides more than just fruits and vegetables. The online store lets you order from brands that include Newman’s Own, Annie’s Sprouts, Tom’s of Maine, and more. It operates through an annual membership system to keep prices down.

4. SPUD

The name SPUD is actually an acronym for Sustainable Produce Urban Delivery. It targets much of the West Coast, including Seattle, the San Francisco Bay Area, plus Los Angeles and Orange County. It also ventures into Canada in Vancouver, Van Island and Calgary. The company lets you design your own box, choosing contents, delivery frequency, prices and whether you only want to receive local goods. Additionally, SPUD lets you order canned goods, baby food, household supplies and sustainably-raised meat.

5. Urban Organic

This company focuses on delivering organic foods to the New York Tri-State area. It makes weekly stops in the boroughs, New Jersey, Long Island and Connecticut. Consumers can pick between four different box sizes, and contents can change weekly. Urban Organic also offers a juicing box, which lets consumers ask for their own juices and smoothies.

These are just five among dozens of companies that offer to deliver organics, but all are good options to make sure an elderly loved one has fresh fruits and vegetables in their diet.

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