Mother's Day Gifts and Activities for Seniors

Mother's Day Gifts and Activities for Seniors

As families’ elderly parents celebrate Mother’s Day, there are many options for activities and gifts that can bring joy to all involved.

As people age, the ultimate expression of love is the way they care for others. This could be an elderly wife caring for her ailing husband, or an adult daughter providing care for her ill mother. This makes celebrating Mother’s Day more difficult than it used to be. One option for a Mother’s Day gift comes in the form of respite care. By finding a temporary stand-in caregiver for a loved one, it gives the adult daughter or older wife a much-needed break. Sometimes a few hours of refreshing separation can be the most help.

There are also several other ideas for possible gifts and activities families can try that can make for an enjoyable experience.

Activities:

  • Go for a scenic drive or tour old neighborhoods. These trips to beautiful locations or down memory lane can lead to meaningful discussions and stories.
  • Create a scrapbook. Going through old photos and recipes and putting them into a book is a fun activity and it creates a treasured item along the way.
  • Go to church or temple. This may be something that is difficult to do on a regular basis, so going on Mother’s Day is rewarding spiritually and it allows your elderly mother to connect with friends.
  • Spend a day working on the yard or in the garden. While your mother may not physically be able to do yard work anymore, she will appreciate spending time outside with you as you work to make the view out her window more beautiful.
  • Play games or put together puzzles. These group activities are full of fun. They keep your mother’s mind active, but do not tax her physically.
  • Ask for help. By involving your elderly mother in any activity, she feels needed. Depending on her physical abilities, you can cook together or work in the garden. Start by asking what she would like to do.
  • Keep promises. With busy lives, it’s easy for people to forget about commitments. By following through, it shows your appreciation.

Gifts:

  • Give your elderly mother the latest large-print book by their favorite author or enroll them in a large-print book club. If that is not an option, a magnifying glass can go a long way.
  • Buy clothes that are easy to get on and off. Using these items helps your elderly mother retain independence because it is something she can do easily herself. If the mock-buttons or snaps are hidden by panels, these clothes can still look fashionable and don’t let others know about your mother’s struggle with dressing herself.
  • Get a foot massager or portable foot bath with whirlpool. This can help if your mother complains of tired or aching feet.
  • Sign up your mother for a Netflix subscription or for another movie service. If your mom loves the Hollywood classics, this can give her the opportunity to once again enjoy the films she loved during her youth. The whole family can watch the films together and it becomes a gift that keeps on giving.
  • Get your mother a subscription to a magazine. There are many magazines devoted to senior health and travel. These can provide a sense of empathy and valuable information. Ask your mother what sort of magazines she would enjoy reading regularly.
  • Get your mom a spa package that can include a massage, a facial, a manicure and/or a pedicure. Check to see if the spa caters to elderly clients. This sort of rejuvenation could be just what your mother needs.
  • Purchase and install a step-in tub. While this can be expensive, it can make a big difference in safety and comfort if your mother has trouble getting in and out of the tub.
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